Grain handling with a Mother Bin practically doubles harvest productivity for Jerry Weinheimer in Onida, South Dakota. Below is the transcript of the video. Watch on YouTube HERE.

I’m Jerry Weinheimer and I farm in central South Dakota. I raise winter wheat, spring wheat, sunflowers and Milo and I do that 4 crop rotation on 1600 acres and so I’m relatively small in the area and so I may be the most unlikely dude to decide to buy a mother bin but I see it as being one of the best investments that I could possibly make because I run older equipment and I actually try to do it mostly by myself without any hired help. I have no full time hired help. I have one guy who comes out just occasionally to help, after hours and on weekends and things like that, so a lot of times I’m just a 1 man operation with a 30 year old combine.

A lot of times  a small combine, just an old 1480 from 1984.

But the way I see it the field capacity and the ability to keep your combine going if you’re a one man operation is the most essential thing and what I was doing before was, I was running a grain cart and a semi, I’d fill those up and the combine bin and shut them down and haul those two units off there and then come back and get the combine going again.

Now with this Mother Bin here I can keep that going throughout the day and never get off the combine and it allows me to unload all the grain in either the nighttime or morning hours when you can’t harvest; so my productivity has practically doubled, Immediately since I put it into operation. I’m amazed what I can actually get done by just simply staying on the combine. So it’s already got me going on that part.

But I considered differences of making big investments like maybe even buying a new combine, big combine, but, if I did that, I would have to also get another truck or something else in the capacity area so with the idea that you just need to get as much done as possible by keeping a combine running I don’t see it as such a bad idea to have a really efficiently cheap combine operation going on.

That’s one phase of what I’ve got going. And then, the irony of the word Mother here comes into play in a big way because I also own a couple more old combines and I’ve got daughters that are capable of running them – they’re going to be 16 and 10 years old – and my Big Bang for this thing is coming this following year here, coming up, with the harvest in that,  and especially in the summertime, when they’re available, because my biggest concern with having daughters driving combines is leaving them in the field unsupervised when I’m off dumping the semi. That’s where this Mother Bin comes into play because now I see that I’ll be able to actually run all three of those combines and I’ll be able to be the leader with them following me around all afternoon so I’ll be able to be in the field and have a lot more efficient operation going on. That way I can let them get their sleep and be prepared to just come out and drive the machines only and be alert all day long and I can do all the dumping and the grain handling after hours whether it’s early in the morning or mid morning  during wheat harvest because a lot of times you can’t cut until 11:00 in the morning anyway, and nighttime for fall harvest, nighttime, morning, all these things but, you wouldn’t buy a brand new combine and then put a 10 year old  on a $350,000 combine you just wouldn’t do such a thing like that. So if you want to incorporate kids into the operation with old cheaper combines that run, the mother bin is the ticket.

So I think I really did myself a favor by buying this thing.

VIEW MOTHER BIN SPECS